Jamaicans lives at risk; Water Security problems

The yallahs pipe line was recently shut down by a group of casual workers ( not NWC permanent employees) for non payment of certain monies for over a year, according to those involved. While that was bad in and of itself, it was what the workers said and what the cameras showed that was even more frightening.

The protesters showed open area where water flowed in the system and said dead animals etc can be or have been found/thrown in  or can be thrown in or any other foreign body or material thus putting the lives of hundreds of thousands at risk.

Surprisingly, I  have heard nothing from civil society, the medical or engineering profession on the safety and security of the water supply system, which can pose a serious risk to our health.

I would like someone to explain to the country, how on earth can a group of temporary can shut down the city’s main water supply system and its  business as usual as if nothing happened, this is freaking scary.

I expect to hear from the Minister of Water, Health and National Security on what systems will be put in place to ensure the nations water supply system is secured !

I am still in shock at what happened and the seemingly indifference of both the public and those in authority to this rather very serious matter.

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2 Responses

  1. I agree with everything you said. After the 9/11 disaster in the US, they started to have local Police protecting the water plant in many Cities in the USA. I notice that a lot of those police presence was withdrawn a year or so later (maybe because of the cost associated with 24/7 police protection.

    What is even more dangerous (IMHO) is the easy access these thieves have to the “Pumping Stations”, where they are constantly stealing the pumping equipment (Pumps). Individuals bent on harm to the general public could easily introduce toxic substance into the Potable Water Supply System.

    Of course, our potable water System face even more threats from inherent deficiencies in the overall water supply chain. Jamaica have very limited use of Backflow Preventer Devices (Cross-Connection) in place to prevent “contaminating sources” (both Residential and Commercial Properties) external to the system from (back) flowing into the supply lines. For example, if a “property” have a garden hose attached to the hose bib (bibb) and the unattached end immersed into a bucket of acid (or any other form of toxic substance), any significant lost in system pressure (cause by, for instance water lock-offs or damage to the system main) will see the acid completely siphon-out of the bucket into the main supply water lines. This could of course be solved by requiring this inexpensive Hose Bib Backflow Preventer such as this one:

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Homewerks-Worldwide-3-4-in-Brass-FPT-x-MHT-Hose-Bibb-Vacuum-Breaker-VACBFPZ4B/202369987

    or requiring all Commercial Property to have other types of Cross-Connect devices in place, such as:

    http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/backflow-preventers-s/8295.htm

    There are a whole host of potential threat to Jamaica’s Water Supply System, including ground water contamination, but backflow contamination, some of which are so gross to even mention, are easily the least expensive to immediately curtail.

    Jay, what happen to the email I submitted to you sometime ago on this subject matter? Why didn’t you publish it on your blog?

    • Unfortunately , I do not recall seeing this particular email you have mentioned here. Please resend to the same email address and let’s see what happened.

      On the matter above, you have made some very good points that must be taken into consideration.

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